​​​​CHISHIHO MURAOKA

I believe that students have the ability to grow by themselves when they are motivated. So the most important thing is motivate students to learn, not just imparting a knowledge to them.

I have seen many students who have motivation make great progress in their study.

Most important aspect of motivating students is engaging them and connecting them to what they study. I hope I can continue to help NP students grow by themselves.

 

 

STELLA THNG My teaching philosophy is to make learning relevant and fun to the audience. Everyone learns better when they can see how the knowledge will personally benefit them. So, I try to show its relevance to what they may face in class or at work. If students like HOW they learn, it deepens the learning. Thus, I use trending topics (from the latest world or local news to pop culture references) to pique their interest. I try to inject lots of humor and stories which, hopefully, will help them remember concepts better. It is a bit like doing Content Marketing in marketing and PR work. I find this technique useful to reach this audience with very short attention span. Finally, I always believe that knowledge is never wasted so I encourage students not to focus just on their core discipline, but to complement it with other sources of information (hint hint: IS modules!). I share my personal experience that although I switched from studying Business in Ngee Ann Poly to Mass Communication in University, being business trained made me a well-rounded magazine editor and subsequently, lecturer.  

 

 

LAU YU CHING

CHISHIHO MURAOKA

I believe that students have the ability to grow by themselves when they are motivated. So the most important thing is motivate students to learn, not just imparting a knowledge to them.

I have seen many students who have motivation make great progress in their study.

Most important aspect of motivating students is engaging them and connecting them to what they study. I hope I can continue to help NP students grow by themselves.

 

 

STELLA THNG My teaching philosophy is to make learning relevant and fun to the audience. Everyone learns better when they can see how the knowledge will personally benefit them. So, I try to show its relevance to what they may face in class or at work. If students like HOW they learn, it deepens the learning. Thus, I use trending topics (from the latest world or local news to pop culture references) to pique their interest. I try to inject lots of humor and stories which, hopefully, will help them remember concepts better. It is a bit like doing Content Marketing in marketing and PR work. I find this technique useful to reach this audience with very short attention span. Finally, I always believe that knowledge is never wasted so I encourage students not to focus just on their core discipline, but to complement it with other sources of information (hint hint: IS modules!). I share my personal experience that although I switched from studying Business in Ngee Ann Poly to Mass Communication in University, being business trained made me a well-rounded magazine editor and subsequently, lecturer.  

 

 

LAU YU CHING

“I often think about what I can offer to my students in this era of hyper-information and short attention spans. How can I make dry and distant topics relevant to these teenagers? How do I open their eyes to the bigger world out there? What can I do to move them into caring about issues beyond their immediate lives, and create a shift in their identities?  Driven by these questions, I feel compelled to constantly keep my lessons dynamic, and to always think of new ways to engage and challenge the class. To me, teaching is very much a performative task – I am at the same time a storyteller, an actress, a game master, a facilitator, a coach, a disciplinarian, a nagging task manager and (as seen by some students) a stepping stone to GPA 4.0. There is a need to play up certain roles at different times, and this depends on listening deeply to the class and to channel their energies accordingly. At the end of the day, what gives me most satisfaction and meaning is when the students and I can create a sense of openness, wonder and discovery together. Learning should make one feel alive - to deliver and embody this spirit is the transcendent purpose for me." 

CHISHIHO MURAOKA

I believe that students have the ability to grow by themselves when they are motivated. So the most important thing is motivate students to learn, not just imparting a knowledge to them.

I have seen many students who have motivation make great progress in their study.

Most important aspect of motivating students is engaging them and connecting them to what they study. I hope I can continue to help NP students grow by themselves.

 

 

STELLA THNG My teaching philosophy is to make learning relevant and fun to the audience. Everyone learns better when they can see how the knowledge will personally benefit them. So, I try to show its relevance to what they may face in class or at work. If students like HOW they learn, it deepens the learning. Thus, I use trending topics (from the latest world or local news to pop culture references) to pique their interest. I try to inject lots of humor and stories which, hopefully, will help them remember concepts better. It is a bit like doing Content Marketing in marketing and PR work. I find this technique useful to reach this audience with very short attention span. Finally, I always believe that knowledge is never wasted so I encourage students not to focus just on their core discipline, but to complement it with other sources of information (hint hint: IS modules!). I share my personal experience that although I switched from studying Business in Ngee Ann Poly to Mass Communication in University, being business trained made me a well-rounded magazine editor and subsequently, lecturer.  

 

 

LAU YU CHING

“I often think about what I can offer to my students in this era of hyper-information and short attention spans. How can I make dry and distant topics relevant to these teenagers? How do I open their eyes to the bigger world out there? What can I do to move them into caring about issues beyond their immediate lives, and create a shift in their identities?  Driven by these questions, I feel compelled to constantly keep my lessons dynamic, and to always think of new ways to engage and challenge the class. To me, teaching is very much a performative task – I am at the same time a storyteller, an actress, a game master, a facilitator, a coach, a disciplinarian, a nagging task manager and (as seen by some students) a stepping stone to GPA 4.0. There is a need to play up certain roles at different times, and this depends on listening deeply to the class and to channel their energies accordingly. At the end of the day, what gives me most satisfaction and meaning is when the students and I can create a sense of openness, wonder and discovery together. Learning should make one feel alive - to deliver and embody this spirit is the transcendent purpose for me." 


2018TeachingAwards.PNG


​​2018TeachingAwards.PNG

Read  on  to  find  out  what   ​our 
2018 Teaching  Awards   ​ IS  Recipients have 
to  share  with   their  ​recipes   for  success.

​​
LAU YU CHING​​

I often think about what I can offer to my students in this era of hyper-information and short attention spans. How can I make dry and distant topics relevant to these teenagers? How do I open their eyes to the bigger world out there? Driven by these questions, I feel compelled to constantly keep my lessons dynamic, and to always think of new ways to engage and challenge the class. 

To me, teaching is very much a performative task – I am at the same time a storyteller, an actress, a game master, a facilitator, a coach and  a disciplinarian. There is a need to play up certain roles at different times, and this depends on listening deeply to the class and to channel their energies accordingly. At the end of the day, what gives me most satisfaction and meaning is when the students and I can create a sense of openness, wonder and discovery together. Learning should make one feel alive - to deliver and embody this spirit is the transcendent purpose for me.​

CHISHIHO MURAOKA

I believe that students have the ability to grow by themselves when they are motivated. The most important thing is  to greatly inspire tudents to learn, besides simply imparting japanese knowledge to them through dry content.  I have seen many students who have the strong motivation to make great progress in their studies independantly of they are interested in the subject matter. 

The most important aspect of encouraging students is engaging them further and helping them find relevance to issues which they are exploring. ​I hope I can continue to help NP students grow through improvements in their foreign language ability- especially in Japanese linguistics and an appreciation for the culture of Japan- in terms of economic and social contexts.


STELLA THNG

My teaching philosophy is to make learning relevant and fun to the audience. Everyone learns better when they can see how the knowledge will personally benefit them. So, I try to show its relevance to what they may face in class or at work. If students like HOW they learn, it deepens the learning. 

Thus, I use trending topics (from the latest world or local news to pop culture references) to pique their interest. I inject lots of humor and stories which, hopefully, will help them remember concepts better. It is a bit like doing Content Marketing in marketing and PR work. I find this technique useful to reach this audience with very short attention span. Finally, I always believe that knowledge is never wasted so I encourage students not to focus just on their core discipline, but to complement it with other sources of information.